Pioneer Victims of the Ft. Mims Massacre
Baldwin County, Alabama
August 30, 1813




The following list was complied by Mr. David P. Mason and is excerpted from "Fort Mims and The Tensaw Settlement", by Dess L. and Tom Sangster, 1988. The booklet may be purchased from Coffeetable Publications, PO Box 884, Bay Minette, AL 36507.

NOTICE: Some researchers have disputed the accuracy of this list as it pertains to the Bryars and Hadley familes. Fort additional inofrmation please contact John Dean


Sir names of families who either were at Fort Mims or who had relatives who were in the fort. In many instances, such as that of Georger Weekley, his wife and children were at the fort and were all killed; while he was on a trip to his home to obtain food for the family. He, alone, in his family escaped the massacre.

Adcock
Allen
Barlow
Bates
Benjamin
Bates
Beckum
Bennet
Bonner
Bradley
Breed
Bryars
Buford
Byrd
Campbell
Capel
Carson
Cato
Carter
Chatham
Clark
Cobb
Connell
Coppedge
Crossman
Curry
Dale
Daniel
Darling
Davenport
David
Davis
Devereau
Dennis
Dewitt
Dismukes
Dixon
Dubose
Durant
Dunn
Dwyer
Earle
Edmunds
Ellis
Espy
Fields
Fleming
Fletcher
Frazer
Ferguson
Gasque
Gates
Gayle
Glenn
Goolsby
Granade
Green
Hadley
Hall
Haley
Hammond
Harris
Hart
Hays
Holmes
Hollinger
Howell
James
Jernigan
Joiner
Jones
Kelly
Kennedy
Kimbrough
King
Lancaster
Langston
Lee
Leslie
Lindsey
Lipscomb
Little
Loper
Lott
Martin
Matthews
Meek
Miles
Middleton
Milstead
Mims
Mizel
Monger
Murphy
Myles
McCall
McConnell
McGhee
McDonald
McIntosh
McMillan
McNeal
Nelson
Newman
Owen
Page
Perkins
Perry
Perryman
Phillips
Pierce
Pollard
Powell
Raines
Randon
Richbourg
Rhodes
Riley
Reuben
Robinson
Richardson
Scott
Simmons
Simms
Salde

Slay
Senegochee
Sizemore
Smith
Spivey
Stiggins
Sumlin
Shamburger
Tanner
Turvin
Taylor
Terry
Thigpin
Slaughter
Thompson
Tryer
Tucker
Weekley
Womack
Whitehead
Williams
Wood
Worsham
Wright
Young


"Major Kennedy, who was sent from Stockton, [AL] to bury the dead, found only 247 bodies which he could identify as being those of the settlers. This is probably accurate for several reasons. Many of the dead were from the half breed population of the Tensaw area, and could easily have been mistaken for Indian dead. This is quite probable because the bodies had lain in the open for about two weeks prior to the arrival of the burial detail and were not only badly decomposed, but had been subject to being consumed by varments, vermin, and vultures. Not only that, but the fact that many of the dead had been inside of the buildings which were destroyed by fire even as they lay dying, further added to the problem of accurately accounting for the number of dead. In view of the fact that in many cases, entire family groups were killed, leaving no survivors makes it entirely probable that we will never know the names of all of the dead nor will we ever have an accurate count."